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Kerberosaurus

Temporal range: Late Cretaceous, 66 MaPreЄ

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Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Clade: Dinosauria
Order: †Ornithischia
Suborder: †Ornithopoda
Family: †Hadrosauridae
Subfamily: †Saurolophinae
Genus: Kerberosaurus

Bolotsky and Godefroit, 2004

Species: K. manakini
Binomial name
Kerberosaurus manakini

Bolotsky & Godefroit, 2004

Synonyms
KundurosaurusGodefroit et al., 2012[1]

Kerberosaurus (meaning "Kerberos lizard") was a genus of saurolophine duckbill dinosaur from the late Maastrichtian-age Upper Cretaceous Tsagayan Formation of Blagoveshchensk, Amur Region, Russia(dated to 66 million years ago).[2] It is based on bone bed material including skull remains indicating that it was related to Saurolophus and Prosaurolophus.

History

In 1984, Yuri Bolotsky and the Amur Complex Integrated Research Institutediscovered a large dinosaur bonebed at Blagoveschensk. Most of the remains were of Amurosaurus (a lambeosaurinehadrosaur), but some came from turtles,crocodilians, theropods, nodosaurids, and a new hadrosaurine.[3] For the hadrosaurine, cranial material (holotypeAENM 1/319, braincase, plus others) was distinctive enough to permit the naming of a new genus.

Description

Diagnostic characters included narrowfrontals, unique form of the braincase, and a well-demarcated division between the area of bone surrounding thenostrils and the bone outside of it.[3] No reconstruction of the fragmentary partial skull was offered. In theircladistic analysis, the authors foundKerberosaurus to be the sister taxon toSaurolophus and Prosaurolophus.[3]

Paleobiogeography

Bolotsky and Godefroit (2004) found the paleobiogeographic implications interesting. The relationship they described provides additional support for land links and faunal interchange between eastern Asia and North America at the end of the Cretaceous, as the other two genera are either known only in North America or are known from a species there. The "sauroloph" group would have had to split from the nest closest group, the "edmontosaur" group, in the earlyCampanian, from Asia, and moved west while leaving a splinter population that would lead to Kerberosaurus, then return to Asia at a later point and produceSaurolophus angustirostris.[3]

Paleobiology

As a hadrosaurid, Kerberosaurus would have been a large bipedal\quadrupedalherbivore, consuming plant matter with complex dental batteries.[4]

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